Urban warfare symposium report published

The International Review of the Red Cross has published a report of a symposium organised jointly by the ICRC, PREMT and the Asia Pacific Centre for Military Law in March 2018. The symposium, titled Emerging Military Technologies Applied to Urban Warfare, brought together governmental, military and academic experts from various disciplines, including law, ethics, political … Read more Urban warfare symposium report published

Ethics meets machines in Australian-first

Researchers are launching a $9 million study which aims to embed ethics and the law into autonomous defence systems, such as self-driving military vehicles. The University of Queensland and University of New South Wales Canberra project represents the biggest investment into understanding the social dimension of military robotics anywhere in the world. The five-year project … Read more Ethics meets machines in Australian-first

Chris Jenks and Rain Liivoja: Machine autonomy and the constant care obligation

The debate about the way the international community should deal with autonomous weapon systems has been ongoing for some five years now. During this time, the focus has been on autonomy in what the ICRC has referred to as the ‘critical functions’ of a weapon system—its capacity to select and attack targets. We argue that … Read more Chris Jenks and Rain Liivoja: Machine autonomy and the constant care obligation

New technologies and the implications for states

Experts from government, military and academia have convened in Brisbane to discuss the legal and practical implications for states of rapidly advancing weapons technologies. The International Committee of the Red Cross, the University of Queensland and the Program on the Regulation of Emerging Military Technologies co-hosted the seminar from 28 to 30 November. “New weapons … Read more New technologies and the implications for states

International Law Studies publishes Melbourne Forum on Emerging Technologies

International Law Studies have published three papers, authored by PREMT members, that are based on presentations given at the Future Wars and Public Conscience symposium held in Melbourne in May 2017: International Humanitarian Law and the Targeting of Data by Tim McCormack [PDF] Weapons Review Obligation under Customary International Law by Natalia Jevglevskaja [PDF] Are … Read more International Law Studies publishes Melbourne Forum on Emerging Technologies

Rain Liivoja: Why it’s so hard to reach an international agreement on killer robots

For several years, civil society groups have been calling for a ban on what they call “killer robots”. Scores of technologists have lent their voice to the cause. Some two dozen governments now support a ban and several others would like to see some kind of international regulation. Yet the latest talks on “lethal autonomous … Read more Rain Liivoja: Why it’s so hard to reach an international agreement on killer robots

Jai Galliott: Why banning autonomous weapons is not a good idea

Some 100 people, including Tesla’s Elon Musk and the late Stephen Hawking, have recently reinforced the call for a ban on “killer robots”, known as lethal autonomous weapons. Public pressure for a ban has been mounting ahead of a United Nations meeting occurring this week in Geneva, with Australian officials in attendance, and rights activists … Read more Jai Galliott: Why banning autonomous weapons is not a good idea

Tim McFarland: Autonomous weapons and human control

Concerns about ensuring sufficient human control over autonomous weapon systems (AWS) have been prominent since the earliest days of the international regulatory debate. They have motivated calls for a comprehensive, proactive ban on development and use of highly autonomous weapons as well as a range of more nuanced proposals for defining and maintaining what is … Read more Tim McFarland: Autonomous weapons and human control